What Kind Of Property Qualifies For Like-Kind Exchange Treatment?

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We think the like-kind exchange provisions of United States tax law (IRC § 1031) have survived the careful tax law deliberations just concluded by Congress. [That’s what we thought when we wrote this blog posting. It now appears that the Senate-House compromise removed personal property from like-kind treatment, preserving only real property as qualified exchange property. Read this posting in that light and assume the current tax bill will be enacted.] So, today’s blog posting might describe the kind of property that can qualify for like-kind, tax-deferment treatment. Or, it might describe what used to be eligible. With that in mind, we remembered that a number of years ago we prepared a Q&A information sheet to explain what property might be eligible for tax deferred, like-kind exchange treatment under § 1031 of the United States Internal Revenue Code and to highlight the availability of such treatment for items of personal property. Tax free exchanges pursuant to § 1031 are subject to strict substantive and procedural rules and it is highly inadvisable to rely on summary materials when structuring such exchanges. Something came up last week that caused us to think about this topic. So, the topic of taxes being all over the press, we thought we would gussy up our prior work and share it with our readers. Some of the phrasing comes from the Regulations that explain the Internal Revenue Code. That’s a hint that any reader wanting to know more would be wise to look there as well. [Read more…]

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Whose Deal Is It Anyway – Ours Or Our Client’s?

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In a perfect world, wouldn’t everyone’s lease or other agreement comments on behalf of the same party be identical (grammar and spelling aside)? Shouldn’t everyone working on behalf of a tenant, landlord, borrower, lender or the like know exactly what her or his “client” wants to see in the agreement? We suppose so, but a perfect world is still pretty far away. And, it isn’t a lack of knowledge (perfect knowledge?) that would result in different agreements for the same client and circumstances if negotiation were done by different people. There are a lot of factors. One factor is that for a lot of good reasons that sound much like “time and money” each negotiator would have her or his own impression as to what that particular client wants or needs. Another is that, for many parts of an agreement, it doesn’t matter – “six of one; a half dozen of another. But, the one that stands out to Ruminations is that those doing the negotiating will actually be substituting their own judgment for that of the party they represent. [Read more…]

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Brokerage Statutes – Shield Or Sword?

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For some reason, it seems that the business of real estate brokerage is subject to a little more scrutiny than experienced by other businesses. For example, there is a common law principle known as the Statute of Frauds. A book could be written about this aspect of the common law and its subsequent incorporation in most state statutes (written law). We won’t write one today.

Most jurisdictions have some form of a Statute of Frauds, and it appears that all or almost all “derive from the Statute for the Prevention of Frauds and Perjuries passed by [the English] Parliament in 1677.” Despite such a lofty name, some have described these laws as “Statutes to Perpetrate Fraud.”

We aren’t going to assume that all readers already know what this kind of “Statute” covers, so here goes. When someone speaks of the Statute of Frauds, she or he is referring to a law that requires enforceable agreements to be in writings signed by the parties against whom someone wants the agreement enforced. The Statute never applied to all agreements and good quality Swiss cheese doesn’t have as many holes as does the Statute of Frauds. [Read more…]

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Landlords, Beware The Naked Assignment

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It’s been a while since we’ve pointed out that, using the words employed by a California court in 2001, “[a] lease of real property is both a conveyance of an estate in land (a leasehold) and a contract. It gives rise to two sets of rights and obligations – those arising by virtue of the transfer of an estate in land to the tenant (privity of estate), and those existing by virtue of the parties’ express agreements in the lease (privity of contract).”

Should anyone care? Yes. And, here’s an example that should concern some landlords and benefit some tenants. It deals with a lease assignment.

We’ll lift the words used by two other California courts to explain two different paths by which an assignee takes on liability as the “tenant.” The first is from 1983 and the second from 1937: [Read more…]

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Do It Perfectly And Still Get Sued

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Isn’t perfect better that good? In a perfect world, it might be. But, in our own, perfection may be flawed. We’re not thinking about the incremental cost of going from good enough to perfect. We’re not talking about the impossibility of achieving perfection (points beyond which being unattainable, because there is nothing more perfect than perfect). We’re not talking about different views as to what constitutes “perfect.” We’re talking about cutting disputes short when one chooses practicality over perfection.

We’re going to illustrate our view by way of a September 20, 2017 court decision dealing with interpreting an insurance policy. Insurance-adverse readers, don’t tune out at this point. This is not about insurance. It is about drafting and language. [Read more…]

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Is There A Limit To Waiving A Non-Waiver Clause?

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When we first wrote about the loophole in non-waiver clauses that recognizes parties can orally agree to waive such clauses even one that explicitly say that there can be no oral waivers, we got some notes expressing incredulity. After the reality set in, the notes started asking whether there were any limits to this “loophole.” We at Ruminations didn’t know how to answer until we came across a May 12, 2017 decision from the Texas Supreme Court in a case where one of the parties has this name: Boo Nathanial Bradberry. The decision can be seen by clicking: HERE. It ruled there was a limit and its reasoning makes pretty good sense. [Read more…]

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How Complicated Can We Make It?

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Last week, we presented a wonky piece about present value calculations and their use. We won’t repeat that or extend those thoughts this week, but within last week’s quantitative jungle was a qualitative thought. Basically, we showed that stepping through annual rent increases doesn’t really produce a much different “total rent” than “keeping it simple” by using a level, average rent over the term of the normal lease. Today, we will spit out some other places where “going complicated” or trying to “refine” the financial terms in a lease also show little benefit and some offsetting detriment.

Before we do so, here’s a little more about setting rent. Last week, we suggested that instead of doing a five year lease with per square foot rents of $10, $11, $12, $13, and $14 over the five years, using the average rent of $12 per square foot would be almost the same in “present dollars” as using the $1 annual increases. We thought a reader or two would point out that there are non-economic reasons to use a graduated rent table. We would point out, that aside from the gender clause (and the like), all provisions of a lease are economic. No reader pitched in. So, we’ll do so (a little) on our own. [Read more…]

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Wonky Ruminations About Present Value

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Everyone knows that a dollar received today is better than a dollar received a year from now. Many realize that it is advantageous to pay a dollar a year from now rather than pay it today. That’s the “time value of money.” It is also based on a pretty good, but not guaranteed, assumption that interest rates and inflation rates will be positive. Historically, that has been a good bet.

We’ve used the word “better” in the sense that most would understand, but “better” is actually in the eyes of the beholder. It is better for the recipient to get the dollar now, but that’s not the case for the payor. [Well, we’ve gotten that out of the way.]

So, which is better when it comes to paying or receiving monthly rent for a five year lease: (a) $12 per square foot of floor area throughout the term; or (b) $10 the first year, $11 the second year, $12 the third year, $13 the fourth year, and $14 the final year? After all, $12 per square foot is right in the middle, it is the average rent “figure” over the five year term. [Read more…]

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