What Can Humpty Dumpty Recover If His Wall Wasn’t Finished On Time?

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Today, we return to the topic of “damages.” Our context will be “waiving” them. That way, we won’t feel as if we are duplicating postings of long ago such as the ones you can review by clicking: HERE or HERE or HERE.

The core “damages” one can expect to collect are designed to give the injured party “the benefit of its bargain.” That’s not the same as being made “whole.” Those core damages, ones that probably should never be “waived” are designed to give a party the money necessary to get what it “bought” in the first place. So, if the buyer was promised a car with a spare tire and the trunk turned out to be empty, the measure of its damages would be the cost of a spare tire. If a tenant was supposed to get trash removal “included” and the full container is surrounded by overflowing trash bags, the tenant is entitled to enough money to get the trash hauled away. If a builder contracted to put up a building and didn’t finish it, the customer would be entitled to the quantum of money that would pay to finish the building.

But, what about the cost of going out to buy that tire? What about the lost business from customers who ran from the store because of the “stink”? What about the cost to rent alternate space because the building was not completed by the contracted-for time? [Read more…]

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Whose Deal Is It Anyway?

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Two stubborn mature men arguing with each other isolated on white background

Rules are made to be broken even if no one knows there was even a rule. In this case, it is Ruminations violating its own rule against two consecutive screech-blog postings. Over the last 300+ postings, we’ve “salted” Ruminations with observations about our own bad habits and those we’ve seen in our generally great real estate community. We’ve tried to space them about a month apart. Last week, we wrote about an all too common way that a minority, but a disturbing minority, of our colleagues try to put the “other” negotiator down. This week we address another one of our “bugs.” That’s a rule-breaker.

To make matters worse for us, we are breaking another one of our rules – the one that has kept us from singling out one subset of our community – this week, the lawyer subset (of which this writer is a very proud member). Our distress isn’t limited to this subset. Certainly we of that persuasion hold no monopoly on the tendency to be complained-about today. Yet, we in that profession certainly suffer more frequently from this affliction than do members of any other subset of the real estate community.

Alright already, what is it? It is thinking that we are the business people who are actually making the deal – forgetting that it is our client’s (or principal’s) deal. How do we do this? We do it by arguing pure business terms as if the money to be paid or received will be coming out of our own pockets. [Read more…]

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(Un)Successful Negotiating: How To Lose Friends And Turn Off Colleagues

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Negotiation and civility are not and should not be mutually exclusive. And, yet, even some of those who agree with that haven’t internalized that principle. Whenever our own thinking brings us back to this pet peeve, we think of a remarkable colleague, one no longer with us. Brilliant and direct, he held strongly developed views and expressed them in a blunt way. Yet, he was never acerbic. Put differently, he had a remarkable ability: to be able to disagree without being disagreeable.

Does anyone really think that telling someone on the other side of a deal: “No one has ever asked for that before, you are being ridiculous,” will bring about the desired result? To our thinking, there are two possibilities. One is that the “ridiculous” proponent of the unprecedented bargaining request plain simply didn’t understand what she or he was asking for. The other possibility, the far more likely one, is that the proponent’s experience is quite different. She or he has heard the request before and likely has made the request, sometimes or even many times, with a successful result. Whichever is the case, directly or impliedly insulting your across-the-table (telephone, email) colleague isn’t likely to be a convincing argument. Basically, it is an ad hominem attack and reveals more about the speaker than the target. [Read more…]

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Just Because The Agreement Allows It Doesn’t Mean It Is Allowed

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First, Ruminations is not expanding its coverage to all that would be considered “contract law.” It’s just that leases, mortgages, and all of the other documents we encounter on a daily basis are just a subset  of the broader category of contracts, ones dealing with real property. Second, although we mostly write about memorializing agreements, from time to time we bring up the topic of how people act once their agreements are executed. Today is such a day.

So, today, Ruminations will be focusing on some post-contract behavior we read about in a January 20, 2017 decision from the Supreme Court of Delaware. For readers who don’t already know this, here’s a valuable piece of information. The Delaware Supreme Court is held in extremely high regard by courts of other states – it is “persuasive.” And, when it overrules the very highly regarded Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware, ears should perk up. [Read more…]

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How Much Insurance Coverage Does The Tenant Have For Damage To Its Leased Premises?

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There are general categories of “insurance.” One is “life and health.” The one we care about is property and casualty,” the industry shorthand for which is: “P&C.” For those of us in this business, the “P” means commercial property insurance. That makes the relevant insurance “commercial general property” insurance. Let’s use that name.

For our purposes, the “C” mainly means “liability” insurance, and that makes the relevant insurance “commercial general liability” coverage. That’s what “CGL” stands for. The “C” in this case stands for “Commercial,” not for any of those other words some of our colleagues insist on using despite your efforts to correct their error.

Most insureds, especially large insureds, will carry both a CGL policy and a commercial property insurance policy. In almost all, but not all, cases, each policy form will consist of the ones promulgated by the Insurance Services Office, Inc. (ISO) modified by multiple endorsement forms (also by the ISO), most of which limit (reduce) the promised coverage.

A meaningful number of small businesses, especially in industries with unique needs, will have “package” policies that combine the “P” and “C” in the same policy. For example, auto repair businesses are exposed to business-related risks associated with taking custody of property owned by others (i.e., property under their care, custody, and control). In addition, garage owners drive customer’s (expensive) cars and are expected to look to their own insurance, and not their customers’ insurance, in the case of an accident. “Package” or “Program” policies are not written on ISO forms. Each insurance company writes its own form, sometimes paralleling ISO language, but there is no guaranty of that. If you are at a small law firm, take a look to see if you have a combined policy. It might be labeled a “Businessowners Policy” or a “BOP.” [Read more…]

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You Snooze; You Lose; Maybe; Probably

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What is in the water that many, too many, landlords drink? What can they be thinking? The same can be said (though not as often) about tenants, and we will do so. What is in the water that many, too many, tenants drink? What can they be thinking?

The subject is asking for money rightfully owed to those drinkers. It might be for taxes or it might be for operating expenses, percentage rent, insurance premiums, reimbursable expenses or refunds for the payment of any one or more of those. It might even be for other things such as overdue rent. Yes, why do rightfully billable charges or rightful claims go unbilled or unclaimed until years later when someone wakes up, often, but not always, a successor landlord or tenant?.

[If you] SNOOZE, you [can] LOSE. “Do not spend your days gathering flowers by the wayside, lest night come upon you before you arrive at your journeys end, and then you will not reach it. [Isaac Watts].

If you haven’t experienced the situation or been asked about the following situation yet, it is just that you haven’t been at this real property leasing thing long enough: After “X” years (“X” often being 5 or more) of failing to bill a tenant for taxes or other monies genuinely owed, a landlord sends out a (BIG) bill. Both the tenant and its landlord turn to trusted advisors and ask: “How far back can the landlord go and still have the right to collect what is owed?” [Read more…]

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For Want Of A Parenthesis A King’s Ransom Could Have Been Lost

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What is every document writer’s nightmare (or at least one of their nightmares)? How about a mere “typo”? “Typo,” short for “typographical error,” is (as all readers already know), “an error (as of spelling) in typed or typeset material.” Count both the “open” and “close” parentheses in the following recital from a 17-1/2 million dollar loan guaranty:

WHEREAS, NNN Cypresswood Drive, LLC, NNN Cypresswood Drive 1, LLC, NNN Cypresswood Drive 3, LLC, NNN Cypresswood Drive 4, LLC, NNN Cypresswood Drive 5, LLC, NNN Cypresswood Drive 6, LLC, NNN Cypresswood Drive 7, LLC, NNN Cypresswood Drive 9, LLC, NNN Cypresswood Drive 10, LLC, NNN Cypresswood Drive 11, LLC, NNN Cypresswood Drive 12, LLC, NNN Cypresswood Drive 13, LLC, NNN Cypresswood Drive 14, LLC, NNN Cypresswood Drive 17, LLC, NNN Cypresswood Drive 18, LLC, NNN Cypresswood Drive 19, LLC, and NNN Cypresswood Drive 20, LLC, each a Delaware limited liability company (as defined in the Security Instrument), the “Borrower”), have obtained a loan (the “Loan”) in the principal amount of Seventeen Million Five Hundred Thousand and No/100 Dollars ($17,500,000.00) from ….

The counts don’t match. Most likely you think there is a missing parentheses. Why aren’t you thinking that there is an extra one? [Read more…]

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Let There Be No More Blog Postings Similar In Concept To Ruminations; We Have An Exclusive

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Many businesspeople reach agreement as to a principle expecting that someone else will express it in words that can be understood, in a common way, by others. So, when it is agreed that a landlord will not allow any “diner similar in concept to the tenant’s diner,” what were the landlord and tenant agreeing-upon? We would think that the tenant didn’t want competition in the form of having another restaurant that drew on the same kind of customer base. Of course, every restaurant competes with every other one, but the marketplace distinguishes between Michelin 3-star establishments and burger joints. That’s a key point whenever an exclusive use restriction is on the bargaining table.

So, was the tenant thinking that some diners would be acceptable and others would not be acceptable? If so, how does one slice and dice the category: diners? [Read more…]

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